• Therapeutic advance in oncology treatments are due in part to a more complete understanding of its genomic portrait. The serial monitoring of tumor genotypes, which are instable and prone to changes under selective pressure, is becoming increasingly needed. Although tumor biopsies remain the reference standard for the diagnosis and genotyping of many types of cancer, they are invasive and not always feasible.
  • Next  generation  sequencing  (NGS),  also  known  as  high-throughput  sequencing,  describes  a  DNA  sequencing  technology  that  has  revolutionized  genomic  research  by  allowing  an  entire  human  genome  to  be  sequenced  within  a  single  day.  In  contrast,  the  previous  sequencing  technology  required  over  a  decade  to  deliver  the  final  draft.  NGS  can  be  used  to  sequence  entire  genomes  or  can  be  constrained  to  specific  areas  of  interest,  including  all  22,000  coding  genes  or  small  numbers  of  individual  genes.  There  are  numerous  opport
  • In February, AHF attended the Sanford Rare Disease Symposium hosted by Sanford Research and the Coordination of Rare Diseases at Sanford (CoRDS) to raise awareness of the importance of rare disease research and provide information to scientists and healthcare providers. The CoRDS registry, established in 2010, is a centralized international patient registry for all rare diseases that aims to connect as many patients and researchers as possible to help advance treatments and cures for rare diseases. 
  • Osteoporosis is a disease in which the density and quality of bone are reduced, leading to weakness of the skeleton and increased risk of fracture, particularly of the spine, wrist, hip, pelvis and upper arm. Osteoporosis and associated fractures are an important cause of mortality and morbidity and primarily affect postmenopausal women and elderly men.
  • With more than 50 million cases reported to the World Health Organization (WHO) each year, dengue is now regarded as the world’s most important mosquito-borne viral disease. Moreover, given that 60% of these reports are from the Americas, predominantly Latin America, dengue infection is a significant and escalating public health problem in Latin America.
  • Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is a rare yet highly aggressive form of skin cancer which, in approximately 80% of cases, is caused by the Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCV). While the dangers of other skin cancers like malignant melanoma are ingrained in most physicians’ minds, MCC remains an unfamiliar and neglected disease.
  • Biomarkers have many potential applications in oncology, including risk assessment, screening, differential diagnosis, determination of prognosis, prediction of response to treatment, and monitoring of progression of disease.
  • About 16 million adolescent girls between 15 and 19 give birth each year. In low- and middle-income countries, complications from pregnancy and childbirth are the leading cause of death among girls aged 15 to 19. The Latin American region has one of the highest rates of unintended pregnancies worldwide. Teenage pregnancies in Latin America are linked to a higher incidence of maternal complications during pregnancy and delivery and children of adolescent mothers are at increased risk of preterm birth, low birth weight and neonatal mortality.
  • In September 2017, AHF convened an ISPOR Educational Forum entitled “Evaluation and Discussion of Current Status of HTA in Oncology in Latin America and Consideration of Future Trends”. The forum was sponsored by FIFARMA and took place in ISPOR’s 6th Latin America Conference in São Paulo, Brazil. Three experts from the Americas and one from Europe were invited to present on key issues around the health technology assessment (HTA) for oncology drugs.